Sen. Dianne Feinstein Officially Running Again

Sen. Dianne Feinstein Officially Running Again

Kerry Wise
October 10, 2017

U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California announced Monday that she will seek a fifth full term next year, ending months of speculation as a growing stable of possible Democratic successors sat in waiting.

Feinstein said her legislation banning bump stocks had attracted "Republican interest" although the 38 co-sponsors so far were all Democrats.

According to the Los Angeles Times, Garcetti wrote, "In this topsy-turvy world of the Trump administration, we need her seniority and her experience now, more than ever", in an invitation to the fundraiser, which he is co-hosting with his wife, Amy Wakeland. She joined the Senate in 1992 after winning a special election. Lots more to do: ending gun violence, combating climate change, access to healthcare.

Still, Feinstein is expected to have the support of most establishment Democrats already in office, and she already has the endorsement of her fellow California Democrat in the Senate.

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Officials say Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock had been stockpiling guns since 1982 and bought 33 firearms in the past year . Authorities believe Paddock brought the weapons into the hotel by himself, but they did not provide specifics.

Feinstein is the oldest USA senator but among several octogenarians, including Republicans Chuck Grassley, Orrin Hatch, Richard Shelby, Jim Inhofe, Pat Roberts and John McCain. She says changing regulations aren't enough and that Congress must pass a law to ensure permanent changes.

Feinstein has taken a leading role in efforts against gun violence, sponsoring an assault weapons ban in the 1990s and more recently the proposed ban on the modification used in the Las Vegas shooting that allows a semiautomatic weapon to perform like an automatic. The devices were found on several of the weapons in the assailant's Las Vegas hotel room.

The mere implication that Trump could be a "good president" drew the ire of state Senate president Kevin de León, whose recent two-day trip to Washington was seen as laying the groundwork for a potential Senate run.

Feinstein's California colleague, Sen. "The fact that the establishment is rallying around her reelection shows that D.C. insiders continued to privilege protecting one of their own over the voters concerns [sic]".